Rubrica biografie

Compton Arthur H. (inglese)

scienzapertutti_Arthur_Compton

 Biografia estratta da Nobel Lectures, Physics 1922-1941. 

nobelprize1927 Premio Nobel per la Fisica

(1892-1962) Arthur Holly Compton was born at Wooster, Ohio, on September 10th, 1892, the son of Elias Compton, Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the College of Wooster. He was educated at the College, graduating Bachelor of Science in 1913, and he spent three years in postgraduate study at Princeton University receiving his M.A.degree in 1914 and his Ph.D. in 1916. After spending a year as instructor of physics at the University of Minnesota, he took a position as a research engineer with the Westinghouse Lamp Company at Pittsburgh until 1919 when he studied at Cambridge University as a National Research Council Fellow. In 1920, he was appointed Wayman Crow Professor of Physics, and Head of the Department of Physics at the Washington University, St. Louis; and in 1923 he moved to the University of Chicago as Professor of Physics.

Compton returned to St. Louis as Chancellor in 1945 and from 1954 until his retirement in 1961 he was Distinguished Service Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Washington University. In his early days at Princeton, Compton devised an elegant method for demonstrating the Earth's rotation, but he was soon to begin his studies in the field of X-rays. He developed a theory of the intensity of X-ray reflection from crystals as a means of studying the arrangement of electrons and atoms, and in 1918 he started a study of X-ray scattering. This led, in 1922, to his discovery of the increase of wavelength of X-rays due to scattering of the incident radiation by free electrons, which implies that the scattered quanta have less energy than the quanta of the original beam. This effect, nowadays known as the Compton effect, which clearly illustrates the particle concept of electromagnetic radiation, was afterwards substantiated by C. T. R. Wilson who, in his cloud chamber, could show the presence of the tracks of the recoil electrons. Another proof of the reality of this phenomenon was supplied by the coincidence method (developed by Compton and A.W. Simon, and independently in Germany by W. Bothe and H. Geiger), by which it could be established that individual scattered X-ray photons and recoil electrons appear at the same instant, contradicting the views then being developed by some investigators in an attempt to reconcile quantum views with the continuous waves of electromagnetic theory.

For this discovery, Compton was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927 (sharing this with C. T. R. Wilson who received the Prize for his discovery of the cloud chamber method). In addition, Compton discovered (with C. F. Hagenow) the phenomenon of total reflection of X-rays and their complete polarization, which led to a more accurate determination of the number of electrons in an atom. He was also the first (with R. L. Doan) who obtained X-ray spectra from ruled gratings, which offers a direct method of measuring the wavelength of X-rays. By comparing these spectra with those obtained when using a crystal, the absolute value of the grating space of the crystal can be determined. The Avogadro number found by combining above value with the measured crystal density, led to a new value for the electronic charge. This outcome necessitated the revision of the Millikan oil-drop value from 4.774 to 4.803 X 10-10 e.s.u. (revealing that systematic errors had been made in the measurement of the viscosity of air, a quantity entering into the oil-drop method). During 1930-1940, Compton led a world-wide study of the geographic variations of the intensity of cosmic rays, thereby fully confirming the observations made in 1927 by J. Clay from Amsterdam of the influence of latitude on cosmic ray intensity. He could, however, show that the intensity was correlated with geomagnetic rather than geographic latitude. This gave rise to extensive studies of the interaction of the Earth's magnetic field with the incoming isotropic stream of primary charged particles.

Compton has numerous papers on scientific record and he is the author of Secondary Radiations Produced by X-rays (1922), X-Rays and Electrons (1926, second edition 1928), X-Rays in Theory and Experiment (with S. K. Allison, 1935, this being the revised edition of X-rays and Electrons), The Freedom of Man (1935, third edition 1939), On Going to College (with others, 1940), and Human Meaning of Science (1940). Dr. Compton was awarded numerous honorary degrees and other distinctions including the Rumford Gold Medal (American Academy of Arts and Sciences), 1927; Gold Medal of Radiological Society of North America, 1928; Hughes Medal (Royal Society) and Franklin Medal (Franklin Institute), 1940. He served as President of the American Physical Society (1934), of the American Association of Scientific Workers (1939-1940), and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1942).

In 1941 Compton was appointed Chairman of the National Academy of Sciences Committee to Evaluate Use of Atomic Energy in War. His investigations, carried out in cooperation with E. Fermi, L. Szilard, E. P. Wigner and others, led to the establishment of the first controlled uranium fission reactors, and, ultimately, to the large plutonium-producing reactors in Hanford, Washington, which produced the plutonium for the Nagasaki bomb, in August 1945. (He also played a role in the Government's decision to use the bomb; a personal account of these matters may be found in his book, Atomic Quest - a Personal Narrative, 1956.) In 1916, he married Betty Charity McCloskey. The eldest of their two sons, Arthur Allen, is in the American Foreign Service and the youngest, John Joseph, is Professor of Philosophy at the Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tennessee ). His brother Wilson is a former President of the Washington State University, and his brother Karl Taylor was formerly President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Compton's chief recreations were tennis, astronomy, photography and music.

He died on March 15th, 1962, in Berkeley, California.

 

copyright-sxt

 

Tags:

© 2002 - 2017 ScienzaPerTutti - Grafica Francesca Cuicchio Ufficio Comunicazione INFN - powered by mspweb

NOTA! Questo sito utilizza i cookie e tecnologie simili.

Se non si modificano le impostazioni del browser, l'utente accetta. Per saperne di piu'

Approvo

Informativa sulla Privacy e Cookie Policy

Ultima modifica: 28 maggio 2018

IL TITOLARE

L’INFN si articola sul territorio italiano in 20 Sezioni, che hanno sede in dipartimenti universitari e realizzano il collegamento diretto tra l'Istituto e le Università, 4 Laboratori Nazionali, con sede a Catania, Frascati, Legnaro e Gran Sasso, che ospitano grandi apparecchiature e infrastrutture messe a disposizione della comunità scientifica nazionale e internazionale e 3 Centri Nazionali dedicati, rispettivamente, alla ricerca di tecnologie digitali innovative (CNAF), all’alta formazione internazionale (GSSI) ed agli studi nel campo della fisica teorica (GGI). Il personale dell'Infn conta circa 1800 dipendenti propri e quasi 2000 dipendenti universitari coinvolti nelle attività dell'Istituto e 1300 giovani tra laureandi, borsisti e dottorandi.

L’INFN con sede legale in Frascati, Roma, via E. Fermi n. 40, Roma, email: presidenza@presid.infn.it, PEC: amm.ne.centrale@pec.infn.it in qualità di titolare tratterà i dati personali eventualmente conferiti da coloro che interagiscono con i servizi web INFN

IL RESPONSABILE DELLA PROTEZIONE DEI DATI PERSONALI NELL’INFN

Ai sensi degli artt. 37 e ss. del Regolamento UE 2016/679 relativo alla protezione delle persone fisiche con riguardo al trattamento dei dati, l’INFN con deliberazione del Consiglio Direttivo n. 14734 del 27 aprile 2018 ha designato il Responsabile per la Protezione dei Dati (RPD o DPO).

Il DPO è contattabile presso il seguente indirizzo e.mail: dpo@infn.it

Riferimenti del Garante per la protezione dei dati personali: www.garanteprivacy.it

Il TRATTAMENTO DEI DATI VIA WEB

L'informativa è resa solo per i siti dell'INFN e non anche per altri siti web eventualmente raggiunti dall'utente tramite link.

Alcune pagine possono richiedere dati personali: si informa che il loro mancato conferimento può comportare l’impossibilità di raggiungere le finalità cui il trattamento è connesso

Ai sensi dell'art. 13 del Regolamento UE 2016/679, si informano coloro che interagiscono con i servizi web dell'Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, accessibili per via telematica sul dominio infn.it, che il trattamento dei dati personali effettuato dall'INFN tramite web attiene esclusivamente ai dati personali acquisiti dall'Istituto in relazione al raggiungimento dei propri fini istituzionali o comunque connessi all’esercizio dei compiti di interesse pubblico e all’esercizio di pubblici poteri cui è chiamato, incluse le finalità ricerca scientifica ed analisi per scopi statistici.

In conformità a quanto stabilito nelle Norme per il trattamento dei dati personali dell’INFN e nel Disciplinare per l’uso delle risorse informatiche nell’INFN, i dati personali sono trattati in modo lecito, corretto, pertinente, limitato a quanto necessario al raggiungimento delle finalità del trattamento, per il solo tempo necessario a conseguire gli scopi per cui sono stati raccolti e comunque in conformità ai principi indicati nell’art. 5 del Regolamento UE 2016/679.

Specifiche misure di sicurezza sono osservate per prevenire la perdita dei dati, usi illeciti o non corretti ed accessi non autorizzati.

L’INFN tratta dati di navigazione perché i sistemi informatici e le procedure software preposte al funzionamento di questo sito web acquisiscono, nel corso del loro normale esercizio, alcuni dati la cui trasmissione è prevista dai protocolli di comunicazione impiegati. Questi dati - che per loro natura potrebbero consentire l'identificazione degli utenti - vengono utilizzati al solo fine di ricavare informazioni statistiche anonime sull'uso del sito e per controllarne il corretto funzionamento. Gli stessi potrebbero essere utilizzati per l'accertamento di responsabilità in caso di compimento di reati informatici o di atti di danneggiamento del sito; salva questa eventualità, non sono conservati oltre il tempo necessario all'esecuzione delle verifiche volte a garantire la sicurezza del sistema.

UTILIZZO DI COOKIE

Questo sito utilizza esclusivamente cookie “tecnici” (o di sessione) e non utilizza nessun sistema per il tracciamento degli utenti.

L'uso di cookie di sessione è strettamente limitato alla trasmissione di identificativi di sessione (costituiti da numeri casuali generati dal server) necessari per consentire l'esplorazione sicura ed efficiente del sito. Il loro uso evita il ricorso ad altre tecniche potenzialmente pregiudizievoli per la riservatezza della navigazione e non prevede l'acquisizione di dati personali dell'utente.

DIRITTI DEGLI INTERESSATI

Gli interessati hanno il diritto di chiedere al titolare del trattamento l'accesso ai dati personali e la rettifica o la cancellazione degli stessi o la limitazione del trattamento che li riguarda o di opporsi al trattamento secondo quanto previsto dagli art. 15 e ss. del Regolamento UE 2016/679. L'apposita istanza è presentata contattando il Responsabile della protezione dei dati presso l’indirizzo email: dpo@infn.it.

Agli interessati, ricorrendone i presupposti, è riconosciuto altresì il diritto di proporre reclamo al Garante quale autorità di controllo.

Il presente documento, pubblicato all'indirizzo: http://www.infn.it/privacy costituisce la privacy policy di questo sito, che sarà soggetta ad aggiornamenti.